Covid-19 Action

1. Managing risk Objective:

To reduce risk to the lowest reasonably practicable level by taking preventative measures, in order of priority

  • Ensuring both workers and clients who feel unwell stay at home and do not attend the venue.
  • Increasing the frequency of handwashing and surface cleaning.
  • Making every reasonable effort to enable working from home as a first option. Where working from home is not possible, we are making every reasonable effort to comply with the social distancing guidelines set out by the government (2m, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, is acceptable.)
  • Taking all the mitigating actions possible to reduce the risk of transmission between our staff.
  • Further mitigating actions include:
  • Further increasing the frequency of hand washing and surface cleaning.
  • Keeping the activity time involved as short as possible.
  • Trying to use screens or barriers to separate workers from each other and workers from customers at points of service.(when ever possible)
  • Using back-to-back or side-to-side working (rather than face-to-face) whenever possible.
  • Reducing the number of people each person has contact with by using ‘fixed teams or partnering’ (so each person works with only a few others).
  • Finally, if people must work face-to-face for a sustained period with more than a small group of fixed partners, then we will assess whether the activity can safely go ahead.
  • Will assess whether the people doing the work are especially vulnerable to COVID-19.

 

2. Providing and explaining available guidance

  • Workers are encouraged to remind customers to follow social distancing advice and clean their hands regularly.
  • Informing customers that they should be prepared to remove face coverings safely if asked to do so by police officers and staff for the purposes of identification.
  • Providing written or spoken communication of the latest guidelines to both workers and customers inside and outside the venue. Displayed posters or information setting out how customers should behave at our venue to keep everyone safe.
  • Ensuring size of queues, does not compromise their safety.
  • Police and the local authorities have the powers to enforce requirements in relation to social distancing.

3. Who should go to work

  • Making sure that only essentially required staff are working .
  • Planning for the minimum number of people needed at the venue to operate safely and effectively.

4. Equality in the workplace

  • Understanding and taking into account the particular circumstances of those with different protected characteristics.
  • Involving and communicating appropriately with workers whose protected characteristics might either expose them to a different degree of risk, or might make any steps you are thinking about inappropriate or challenging for them.
  • Making reasonable adjustments to avoid disabled workers being put at a disadvantage, and assessing the health and safety risks for new or expectant mothers.
  • Making sure that the steps you take do not have an unjustifiable negative impact on some groups compared to others, for example, those with caring responsibilities or those with religious commitments.

5. Social distancing for workers

  • Maintaining social distancing in the venue wherever possible.
  • Where the social distancing guidelines cannot be followed in full in relation to a particular activity, businesses should consider whether that activity needs to continue for the business to operate, and, if so, take all the mitigating actions possible to reduce the risk of transmission between their staff. Mitigating actions include:
  • Further increasing the frequency of hand washing and surface cleaning.
  • Keeping the activity time involved as short as possible.
  • Using screens or barriers to separate workers from each other and workers from customers at points of service.
  • Using back-to-back or side-to-side working (rather than face-to-face) whenever possible.
  • Reducing the number of people each person has contact with by using ‘fixed teams or partnering’ (so each person works with only a few others).
  • Social distancing applies to all parts of a business, not just the place where people spend most of their time, but also entrances. These are often the most challenging areas to maintain social distancing and workers are specifically reminded.

6. Coming to work and leaving work

  • Reduced staffing levels to maintain social distancing
  • Staggering arrival and departure times at work to reduce crowding into and out of the venue, taking account of the impact on those with protected characteristics.
  • Providing additional parking or facilities such as bike racks to help people walk, run, or cycle to work where possible.
  • Reducing congestion, for example, by having more entry points to the venue.
  • Using markings to guide staff coming into or leaving the building.
  • Providing handwashing facilities, or hand sanitiser where not possible, at entry and exit points.
  • Providing storage for staff clothes and bags.
  • Requesting staff change into work uniforms on site using appropriate facilities/changing areas, where social distancing and hygiene guidelines can be met.
  • Washing uniforms on site, where appropriate, or requesting workers to regularly wash uniforms at home.

7. Moving around venues

  • Reviewing layouts and processes to allow staff to work further apart from each other.
  • Arranging people to work side-by-side or facing away from each other rather than face-to-face. Where this is not possible, using screens to separate people from each other.
  • Using floor tape or paint to mark areas to help people comply with social distancing guidelines (2m, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, is acceptable).

8. Food preparation areas

  • Minimising interaction between kitchen staff and other workers, including when on breaks.

Putting teams into shifts to restrict the number of workers interacting with each other.

  • Following government guidance on managing food preparation and food service areas.
  • Allowing kitchen access to as few people as possible.
  • Using ‘one way’ traffic flows to minimise contact.
  • Minimising access to walk-in pantries, fridges and freezers, for example, with only one person being able to access these areas at one point in time.
  • Spacing working areas to maintain social distancing guidelines (2m, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, is acceptable) as much as possible, recognising the difficulty of moving equipment such as sinks, hobs and ovens. Consider cleanable panels to separate working areas in larger kitchens. Providing floor marking to signal social distancing (2m, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, is acceptable).
  • Minimising contact at ‘handover’ points with other staff, such as when presenting food to serving staff and delivery drivers.

9. Back of house and common areas

  • Creating additional space by using other parts of the venue or building that have been freed up by remote working.
  • Installing screens to protect staff in front of house areas or serving customers at till points.
  • Staggering break times to reduce pressure on the staff break rooms or places to eat and ensuring social distancing is maintained in staff break rooms.

Using safe outside areas for breaks.

  • Using social distance marking for other common areas such as toilets, showers, lockers and changing rooms and in any other areas where queues typically form.

10. Accidents, security and other incidents

  • Reviewed incident and emergency procedures to ensure they reflect the social distancing principles as far as possible.
  • Trained staff to keep people safe. Dedicated staff to encourage social distancing or to manage security.
  • Made enough changes practices in response to COVID-19, as any revisions may present new or altered security risks which may need mitigations.

Comments are closed.